Big Data: Urban Agriculture’s Future?

One of the biggest challenges in studying urban agriculture is to figure out its long-term value. Urban agriculture (UBA) is evolving and filled with uncertainties, inequities and hidden problems. For example, some people think UBA is the solution to feeding 9 billion people by 2050. But others think that UBA favors politics (votes from wealthy communities) and economic growth (job creation in impoverished areas). How can we understand the risks and rewards of UBA? Is urban agriculture a viable food source for the future?

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What’s Next? An Urban Ag Update

When I started my dissertation on urban agriculture, I learned about the different ways that a city can grow food. Urban agriculture is growing, processing and distributing food in the city. It also is a link between agriculture and urban development – housing, commercial and business development, schools. Urban agriculture is also about food production and urban planning. It includes the suburbs and fringe areas near the city. Urban agriculture means growing food in containers, window sills, backyards, rooftops, freight containers, farms and community gardens. In 2018, I wonder how urban agriculture is evolving and if it can be a stable food source for the future. Below is a snapshot of urban agriculture today...

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Willie Nelson and Urban-Rural Ag

Poverty is a worldwide problem. Urban and rural communities in every country struggle to survive. Poverty means food insecurity or economic and social conditions where people have little or uncertain access to enough food. Food insecurity hits people in urban, rural, and peri-urban areas (communities located around cities). While it’s easy to think that food insecurity is just an urban problem, clearly it is not. Hunger is not in a vacuum. Even if food is abundant, many people don’t have enough food on a regular basis. How can we feed more people? What are the connections between urban-rural agriculture?

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Practicing Your Craft

One of my takeaways from graduate school was that we learned to be scholar-practitioners. Dr. Patti and I continue to transition into our new roles: to conduct research and write as scholars. But the practitioner part is not an easy transition. This part requires an active, conscious effort to apply new knowledge to practice your craft.

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